Tagged with: cruelty

Joachim Kroll the Cannibal Serial Killer from Germany

Joachim Kroll the Cannibal Serial Killer from Germany

60s

Joachim Kroll was conceived the child of a mineworker in Hindenburg (Zabrze), Province of Upper Silesia. He was the remainder of eight kids. He was a feeble kid and used to wet the bed. His instruction was poor, just achieving Grade 3. Therapists later found that he had an IQ of 76.  After the finish of World War II, Joachim Kroll moved with his family to North Rhine-Westphalia. Joachim Kroll started assassinating in 1955, after his mom disappeared. Around 1960, he went to Duisburg and looked for some kind of employment as a latrine specialist for Mannesmann. A short time later he worked for Thyssen Industries and went to 24 Friesen road, Laar, an area of Duisburg. Around then he continued murdering people around. For more than 20 years, sex... Read More

Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs (Hammer Brothers) - This is the TRUE STORY

Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs (Hammer Brothers) - This is the TRUE STORY

2007

Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs (3 guys 1 hammer) – Warning; GRAPHIC Story And Photos Igor Suprunyuck (left) – Alexander Hanzha (middle) – Viktor Sayenko (far right) Photo’s and video link are GRAPHIC, not for the faint of heart. If you want to skip the story and go right to the gory video then go to the bottom of this post and click the link. Residents in the small town of Dnepropetrovsk located in Ukraine, were on high-alert during the summer of 2007. A killer(s) was on a gruesome murder-spree and didn’t care who they hurt or what time of day it was or if people were around to witness. Male, females and children were brutally murdered in a random acts of violence. What made it even scarier is the fact that the killers didn’t... Read More

The Ferocious Murder of Sylvia Likens, the TRUE story

The Ferocious Murder of Sylvia Likens, the TRUE story

1965

Gertrude Baniszewski lived in Indianapolis with her seven children. Since she had a tiny income, Baniszewski took in children for the Summer to earn extra money. In 1965, she agreed to board sixteen years old Sylvia Likens and her sister Jenny, who was a year younger. They were the children of two circus workers who were about to go on tour operating a concession stand. Jenny was disabled and could not move about very much (Gertrude Baniszewski cynically thought that a 'cripple' would be an undemanding boarder); perhaps the Likens' decision to spare their daughters from the wandering lifestyle of the circus was influenced by Jennie's condition? Perhaps they wanted time by themselves to patch up their marriage? Their relationship had been through a bad patch (... Read More