Green Inferno

Green Inferno - Eli Roth
2015
5
Director: 
Eli Roth

SYNOPSIS: 

New York college student Justine (Lorenza Izzo), a lawyer's daughter, meets a student activist named Alejandro (Ariel Levy) when he goes on a hunger strike on behalf of underpaid janitors. Smitten, Justine agrees to help Alejandro undertake his next project: to save the Amazon. She soon learns to regret her decision when their plane crashes in the Peruvian jungle and she and the rest of their group are taken captive by a tribe of hungry cannibals.

REVIEW: 

I must admit The Green Inferno had such promise.  I heard a lot about it before the screening, and was obviously thrilled at the Cannibal Holocaust comparison. 

It’s such a shame that I didn’t enjoy this more than I did.

It’s got a strong start, setting the scene nicely up in this bitch (you’ll get that later – line of the year, ammaright Mitch?), beginning with a well executed plane crash scene, which seemed to genuinely impress all.  Then followed some actually scary, skin crawling action when the kids meet the villagers.  This is where it lost me.  What should have been a terrifying turn of events, drawing on our primal fears, quickly became a college like comedy.  Stoner jokes, in which the villagers get off their noggin and start eating flesh – really – cannibal munchies.  Fart jokes and crap jokes (actual faeces, not just poorly written puns – though I think it had those too), where one of the kids takes a dump outside a cage. THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE! How DARE you lure me in with promises of terror and give me TOILET HUMOUR!

I mean:  the plot sounded too good to be anything less than a serious, played for straight horror. 

The pre-release shots alone looked amazing, and gave no impression that there was going to be over the top humour. The ‘jokes’ completely overshadowed any effect that the deaths could have mustered and, because of this, I just didn’t care if their intestines were eaten for breakfast.

Eli you can do better than this!!

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