Noroi: The Curse

Noroi: The Curse
2005
10
Director: 
Kôji Shiraishi

SYNOPSIS: 

A documentary filmmaker explores seemingly unrelated paranormal incidents connected by the legend of an ancient demon called the "kagutaba."

REVIEW: 

It’s true that when it’s bad, it’s really bad, but there are a few gems out there that make it all worthwhile. The other day I managed to see what might be the most complex one yet, one that doesn’t sacrifice story for the sake of cheap shocks. This film, my friends, is Noroi the Curse, from director Kôji Shiraishi.

Bearing more resemblance to something like Brian De Palma’s Redacted* than Paranormal Activity, the film is structured as a mockumentary by the fictional paranormal investigator/journalist Masafumi Kobayashi. He and his crew are called in to investigate after a woman complains that she can hear the sound of a baby crying every night from her neighbor’s house. Normally, this wouldn’t be so weird, except her neighbor (the eccentric and hostile Junko Ishii) doesn’t have a baby–only a 6-year-old son.

Kobayashi tries to interview Ishii, who responds in a manner not unlike a certain famous filmmaker did in some real found footage. Not long after this Ishii and her son move away, and the neighbor happily reports that the crying has ceased. Five days later she and her daughter are killed in a car accident. Kobayashi moves on, not seeing a direct relation between the two events. As he investigates some seemingly unrelated stories, however, he discovers some disturbing connections to this original incident, and it all leads back to stories of a demon called the Kagutaba….

Though the film is longer than most of its ilk (with a running time of 115 minutes), I actually found it to be consistently engaging. The viewer is shown many strange incidents from various sources (whether it be a reality TV show, a variety show, stuff filmed by Kobayashi’s crew, or an old 16 mm film), and the fun comes in piecing it all together. Thankfully the mystery itself doesn’t disappoint thanks to the strange mythology developed by the filmmakers. Like the makers of The Blair Witch Project and Cloverfield, the writers here built up a strong backstory for their found footage, only in this case they actually put it on the screen instead of in a viral marketing campaign! I won’t spoil it here, but it’s gripping stuff, and for the most part it ties everything together beautifully.

Despite my enthusiasm I must admit that Noroi isn’t without flaws. Though more subtle than a Paranormal Activity, it still suffers from a few too many phony looking “subliminal” effects. They are too overdone and drawn out (even as short as they are) to really work, and harm the movie’s feeling of reality. Likewise there is one scare near the end of the film that utilizes some less than convincing CGI. I’m guessing some people will also take issue with the character of Mitsuo Hori, who is admittedly a bit over-the-top in his craziness. He kind of grew on me by the end, but I did question why Kobayashi was always so keen to collaborate with such an unstable and dangerous person, even if he is a psychic!

Actually, I find his rants about pigeons and ectoplasmic worms to be kind of cute in a please-don't-hurt-me sort of way.

This movie full of creep, and amazing horror sense, we recommend the horror lover to must watch. but it's only available in the japanese version. But anyone can watch by downloading the subtitles of this movie if you know English.

 
Well we would love rate this movie 9.2/10

 

SIMILAR MOVIES REVIEWS

OTHER MOVIES REVIEWS

Vampires

1998

Jack Crow is much more than a vampire hunter. He is a war machine that considers vampires as the embodiment of Evil and teammates as soldiers to be strictly trained so that they never fail. The Vatican monitors him from afar, assists him through specially trained priests, and supports him economically. This unlikely but functional partnership between this sort of crepuscular cow boy and one of the most important religious institutions in the world undergoes a stop when the ancient and powerful Valek breaks into the room where a vampire hunting party is celebrating, making... Read More

The Curse of La Llorona Review

The Curse of La Llorona

2019

If you’re a fan of the ever-expanding universe of The Conjuring, then it makes sense that The Curse of La Llorona would definitely be on your radar. It is the sixth addition to the franchise, joining other recent hits like The Nun and Annabelle in fleshing out the world first introduced by the original Conjuring back in 2013. It’s also the directorial debut of Michael Chaves (who will also be directing the upcoming Conjuring 3) and is, of course, produced by James Wan. Linda Cardellini (Strangeland), Raymond Cruz (From Dusk Till Dawn 2), Sean Patrick Thomas (Kemper, The... Read More

Pet Sematary Review

Pet Sematary

2019

Whether you’re the type of person who loves remakes or simply the type who loves to hate them, it’s highly likely that 2019’s Pet Sematary is on your radar for one reason or another if you’re into horror. It’s directed by Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer (who also directed Starry Eyes) and is, of course, a reboot of the classic Stephen King film Pet Sematary from 1983. Pet Sematary stars Jason Clarke (Winchester, Trust), Amy Seimatz (The Sacrament, You’re Next, Bitter Feast), and the always legendary John Lithgow (Raising Cane, Twilight Zone: The Movie). Those who aren’t... Read More

Candyman

1992

In this unfairly forgotten film, Bernard Rose proposes a terrible genius loci: in fact a popular area (Cabrini-Green) seems to be manned by Candyman, a bloodthirsty spirit that guts with a hook anyone who summons him in front of the mirror. Helen finds him out by chance, collecting interviews for her thesis on contemporary folklore. After discovering that some years earlier, precisely in the Cabrini-Green, some violent homicides remained unpunished, Helen hypothesizes to have mistakenly collected only narratives, concerning real events that have been modified, year by... Read More

Hereditary - Evil runs in the family

2018

“Hereditary”  is a literally "homemade" horror. The physical home, as a place of family life and as creative microcosm of Annie, and the metaphysical home, as a dreamlike symbol of the stability or instability of the Ego, are inextricably intertwined in a game of Chinese boxes : a husband , a son, a daughter, and a miniaturist job she loves. But also a bulky mother: Ellen. Annie has always been trying to fix her "home": and soon we realize that something, in addition to the ambivalent relationship between her and the now defunct Ellen, does not work. Starting from... Read More